Mattis Wanted Congressional Approval Before Striking Syria. He Was Overruled.

Mattis Wanted Congressional Approval Before Striking Syria. He Was Overruled. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis on Tuesday. He briefed lawmakers on Capitol Hill about last week’s allied airstrikes in Syria. Erin Schaff for The New York Times WASHINGTON — Defense Secretary Jim Mattis urged President Trump to get congressional approval before the United States launched airstrikes against Syria last week, but was overruled by Mr. Trump, who wanted a rapid and dramatic response, military and administration officials said.Mr. Trump, the officials said, wanted to be seen as backing up a series of bellicose tweets with action,…
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Adolescents’ cooking skills strongly predict future nutritional well-being

Adolescents' cooking skills strongly predict future nutritional well-being Evidence suggests that developing cooking and food preparation skills is important for health and nutrition, yet the practice of home cooking is declining and now rarely taught in school. A new study found that developing cooking skills as a young adult may have long-term benefits for health and nutrition. Full Story
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Boosting employment rate is unlikely to curb opioid use

Boosting employment rate is unlikely to curb opioid use Improving job prospects for people in economically depressed parts of the United States is unlikely to help curb the opioid epidemic, according to a new study. On the other hand, opioid use may actually help some women -- but not men -- stay in the labor force when they would otherwise leave because of chronic pain. Full Story
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Text messaging tool may help fight opioid epidemic

Text messaging tool may help fight opioid epidemic Medical researchers have created a new automated text messaging service that may curb opioid abuse and prevent relapse. Patients receive text messages to gauge if they're feeling OK or struggling with potential relapse. Patients also can activate a panic button to request immediate help. Full Story
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Marine fish won an evolutionary lottery 66 million years ago

Marine fish won an evolutionary lottery 66 million years ago Why do the Earth's oceans contain such a staggering diversity of fish of so many different sizes, shapes, colors and ecologies? The answer, biologists report, dates back 66 million years ago, when a six-mile-wide asteroid crashed to Earth, wiping out the dinosaurs and approximately 75 percent of animal and plant species worldwide. Full Story
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I.R.S. Website Glitch Leaves Last-Minute Tax Filers Scrambling

I.R.S. Website Glitch Leaves Last-Minute Tax Filers Scrambling Visitors to the direct pay portion of the Internal Revenue Service’s website on Tuesday received a warning that the service was unavailable. Taxpayers were told that their payments were still due despite the outage.WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service had an unexpected message for procrastinators who waited until Tuesday to make their annual Tax Day payments through the agency’s website: Come back on Dec. 31, 9999.An outage on the agency’s website, which began on Tuesday morning and was unresolved by midday, crippled a crucial part of the…
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India’s swing in favor of girls

India’s swing in favor of girls Public outcry over the rape of a girl hints at a growing confidence to confront old attitudes toward women and girls. The confidence may come from a dramatic success in reducing child marriages. Full Story
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Resilience counteracts effects of childhood abuse and neglect on health

Resilience counteracts effects of childhood abuse and neglect on health Researchers have determined that psychological resilience has a positive effect on health outcomes for people living with schizophrenia. This is the first study to quantitatively assess the effects of both childhood trauma and psychological resilience on health and metabolic function in people living with schizophrenia. Full Story
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Resilience counteracts effects of childhood abuse and neglect on health

Resilience counteracts effects of childhood abuse and neglect on health Researchers have determined that psychological resilience has a positive effect on health outcomes for people living with schizophrenia. This is the first study to quantitatively assess the effects of both childhood trauma and psychological resilience on health and metabolic function in people living with schizophrenia. Full Story
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Can a simple blood test rule out lung cancer?

Can a simple blood test rule out lung cancer? A blood test to measure the levels of two proteins in plasma that are common predictors of lung cancer was 98 percent effective in a multicenter clinical trial at distinguishing benign from malignant lung nodules when combined with a patient's clinical characteristics to form an integrated classifier. Full Story
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Siblings’ experiences in middle childhood predict differences in college graduation status

Siblings' experiences in middle childhood predict differences in college graduation status Graduating from college has significant implications for adults' long-term success, including employment, family formation, and health. A new longitudinal study found that when siblings in middle childhood experienced less warmth in their relationships with each other, spent different amounts of time with their fathers, or thought their parents treated them unfairly relative to their siblings, they were more likely to differ in their college graduation status (i.e., graduating versus not graduating). Full Story
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Using AI to detect heart disease

Using AI to detect heart disease Predicting and monitoring cardiovascular disease is often expensive and tenuous, involving high-tech equipment and intrusive procedures. However, a new method developed by researchers offers a better way. By coupling a machine learning model with a patient's pulse data, they are able to measure a key risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and arterial stiffness, using just a smart phone. Full Story
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Researchers chart a new way to look at concussion

Researchers chart a new way to look at concussion A research team studying concussion has published an interactive diagram showing the many facets of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) -- from sleep problems to mood disorders to the increased danger of dementia -- and how they connect with and affect each other. Full Story
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Foodborne illness caused by common agricultural practice, casts doubts on biocidal product labeling

Foodborne illness caused by common agricultural practice, casts doubts on biocidal product labeling Chlorine, commonly used in the agriculture industry to decontaminate fresh produce, can make foodborne pathogens undetectable, according to new research. The study may help explain outbreaks of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes among produce in recent years. Full Story
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Giant group of octopus moms discovered in the deep sea

Giant group of octopus moms discovered in the deep sea At the bottom of the ocean, scientists discovered hundreds of small pink octopuses and their eggs. The colonies were in warmer water than is healthy for octopuses, which means that they probably won't survive. That makes the scientists think there are probably even bigger colonies thriving in the cool rock crevices nearby. Full Story
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The microbiome of a native plant is much more resilient than expected

The microbiome of a native plant is much more resilient than expected The microbiome, which consists of all microorganisms that live on or in plants, animals and also humans, is important for the health and development of these organisms. Scientists investigated how a plant responds to manipulations of its microbial associations. The results indicate that the enormous bacterial diversity residing in natural soils may account for the stability of the plant-microbiome relationship. Full Story
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How does plant DNA avoid the ravages of UV radiation?

How does plant DNA avoid the ravages of UV radiation? Plants can't come in from the sun or slather on sunblock; instead they have a super robust DNA repair kit to combat UV radiation. Today, the lab of 2015 Nobel laureate Aziz Sancar published the first repair map of an entire multicellular organism to show how the 'nucleotide excision repair' system works much more efficiently in the active genes of plants as compared to humans. And this efficiency depends on the day/night cycle. Full Story
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It’s never too late to experience healing

It’s never too late to experience healing Faced with joint degeneration in her hands and thinking it was too late to do anything about it, today’s contributor found complete healing and regeneration through a fresh perspective on how God cares for all of creation. Full Story
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Trump Scraps New Sanctions Against Russia, Overruling Advisers

Trump Scraps New Sanctions Against Russia, Overruling Advisers President Trump boarding Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland on Monday. He has, for now, rejected new sanctions against Russia. Doug Mills/The New York Times WASHINGTON — President Trump rejected, for now at least, a fresh round of sanctions set to be imposed against Russia on Monday, a course change that underscored the schism between the president and his national security team.The president’s ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki R. Haley, had announced on Sunday that the administration would place sanctions on Russian companies…
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James Comey’s Attacks on Trump May Hurt a Carefully Cultivated Image

James Comey’s Attacks on Trump May Hurt a Carefully Cultivated Image James B. Comey, the former F.B.I. director, days before he was fired last May. Although he appears to disdain partisanship, he has sharply criticized President Trump while promoting his own book. Gabriella Demczuk for The New York Times WASHINGTON — For decades, James B. Comey cultivated an image of purity as a lawman who stood above politics and politicians.Then came the book tour.With the release of his memoir this week and a set of high-profile media interviews to publicize it, Mr. Comey — whose…
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Warming climate could speed forest regrowth in eastern US

Warming climate could speed forest regrowth in eastern US Warming climate could speed the natural regrowth of forests on undeveloped or abandoned land in the eastern United States, according to a new study. Previous research has shown that the succession from field to forest can happen decades sooner in the southeastern US than in the Northeast. But it wasn't obvious why. A new study points to temperature as the major factor influencing the pace of reforestation. Full Story
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Nursing Election Grievances, Hillary Clinton Supporters Curse Comey

Nursing Election Grievances, Hillary Clinton Supporters Curse Comey President Trump has seized on the frustration of Hillary Clinton supporters to rant about James B. Comey, tapping into — and twisting — the Democratic angst. Doug Mills/The New York Times WASHINGTON — When it comes to James B. Comey’s book-tour crusade against President Trump, the question for hard-core Hillary Clinton fans boils down to this: Curse Mr. Comey, or cheer him?Curse him, mostly.They may be card-carrying members of “the Resistance,” who oppose everything that the president stands for, but Mrs. Clinton’s former aides and advisers are…
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Trump to Impose New Sanctions on Russia Over Support for Syria

Trump to Impose New Sanctions on Russia Over Support for Syria The Trump administration plans to impose new sanctions against Russia on Monday, the third round enacted by the administration against Russia in the past four weeks. Tom Brenner/The New York Times WASHINGTON — The Trump administration plans to impose new sanctions against Russia on Monday to punish it for enabling the Syrian government’s use of chemical weapons in its civil war, the latest in a series of actions by both sides underscoring the deterioration in relations between Moscow and the West.The sanctions, coming shortly…
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Trump’s attack on Syria: a bias for hope?

Trump’s attack on Syria: a bias for hope? The pessimism that prevails after Trump degraded Syria’s chemical weapons reflects a wider pessimism about progress in human rights. But does the evidence support such naysayers. And are they defeating their own cause? Full Story
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When nuclei catch up with electrons

When nuclei catch up with electrons In an attosecond study of the H2 molecule physicists found that for light atomic nuclei -- as contained in most organic and biological molecules -- the correlation between electronic and nuclear motions cannot be ignored. Full Story
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Comey, in Interview, Calls Trump ‘Morally Unfit’ and ‘Stain’ on All Around Him

Comey, in Interview, Calls Trump ‘Morally Unfit’ and ‘Stain’ on All Around Him James B. Comey, the former F.B.I. director, used his interview on the ABC News program “20/20” to amplify many of the disclosures in his tell-all memoir. Ralph Alswang/ABC News WASHINGTON — If there was any chance that President Trump and James B. Comey could have avoided all-out war, it ended Sunday night.That was when ABC News aired an interview with Mr. Comey, the president’s fired F.B.I. director, as he uses a publicity blitz for his searing tell-all memoir, “A Higher Loyalty,” to…
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James Comey’s Interview on ABC’s ‘20/20’: Annotated Excerpts

James Comey’s Interview on ABC’s ‘20/20’: Annotated Excerpts ImageJames B. Comey, the former F.B.I. directorCreditGabriella Demczuk for The New York TimesSectionsSkip to contentSkip to site indexJames Comey’s Interview on ABC’s ‘20/20’: Annotated ExcerptsJames B. Comey, the former F.B.I. directorCreditGabriella Demczuk for The New York TimesABC News aired an hourlong interview on Sunday with James B. Comey, the F.B.I. director fired by President Trump last year. George Stephanopoulos, ABC’s chief anchor, interviewed Mr. Comey, who is promoting his new book, “A Higher Loyalty,” for five hours in all. ABC published a complete transcript of their conversation.…
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Trump Blasts Comey in Barrage of Tweets, Calling Him ‘Slippery’

Trump Blasts Comey in Barrage of Tweets, Calling Him ‘Slippery’ President Trump called James Comey, the former F.B.I. director, a “slime ball” for the second time this week. It was one of numerous disparaging comments Mr. Trump made about Mr. Comey on Twitter on Sunday morning. Tom Brenner/The New York Times For the second time in a week, President Trump on Sunday excoriated the former F.B.I. director James B. Comey in a series of tweets after details from Mr. Comey’s tell-all book were leaked before its official release.In the latest tirade, which unfolded over an…
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We think we’re the first advanced earthlings — but how do we really know?

We think we're the first advanced earthlings -- but how do we really know? Imagine if, many millions of years ago, dinosaurs drove cars through cities of mile-high buildings. A preposterous idea, right? In a compelling thought experiment, scientists wonder how we would truly know if there were a past civilization so advanced that it left little or no trace of its impact on the planet. Full Story
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We think we’re the first advanced earthlings — but how do we really know?

We think we're the first advanced earthlings -- but how do we really know? Imagine if, many millions of years ago, dinosaurs drove cars through cities of mile-high buildings. A preposterous idea, right? In a compelling thought experiment, scientists wonder how we would truly know if there were a past civilization so advanced that it left little or no trace of its impact on the planet. Full Story
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Course set to overcome mismatch between lab-designed nanomaterials and nature’s complexity

Course set to overcome mismatch between lab-designed nanomaterials and nature's complexity Advances in nanotechnology have made it possible to control the size, shape, composition, elasticity and chemical properties of laboratory-made nanomaterials. Yet many of these materials do not to function as expected in the body. In new research, the team homes in on biomembranes -- the gatekeeping bilipid-layers and proteins surrounding cells. They explore the barriers a synthetic nanomaterial must breach to enter a cell and achieve its intended purpose. Full Story
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Course set to overcome mismatch between lab-designed nanomaterials and nature’s complexity

Course set to overcome mismatch between lab-designed nanomaterials and nature's complexity Advances in nanotechnology have made it possible to control the size, shape, composition, elasticity and chemical properties of laboratory-made nanomaterials. Yet many of these materials do not to function as expected in the body. In new research, the team homes in on biomembranes -- the gatekeeping bilipid-layers and proteins surrounding cells. They explore the barriers a synthetic nanomaterial must breach to enter a cell and achieve its intended purpose. Full Story
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How does one prepare for adverse weather events? Depends on your past experiences

How does one prepare for adverse weather events? Depends on your past experiences With much of the central plains and Midwest now entering peak tornado season, the impact of these potentially devastating weather events will be shaped in large part by how individuals think about and prepare for them. A new study shows that people's past experiences with tornadoes inform how they approach this type of extreme weather in the future, including their perception of the risk. Full Story
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How does one prepare for adverse weather events? Depends on your past experiences

How does one prepare for adverse weather events? Depends on your past experiences With much of the central plains and Midwest now entering peak tornado season, the impact of these potentially devastating weather events will be shaped in large part by how individuals think about and prepare for them. A new study shows that people's past experiences with tornadoes inform how they approach this type of extreme weather in the future, including their perception of the risk. Full Story
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Virtual contact lenses for radar satellites

Virtual contact lenses for radar satellites Radar satellites supply the data used to map sea level and ocean currents. However, up until now the radar's 'eyes' have been blind where the oceans are covered by ice. Researchers have now developed a new analysis method to solve this problem. Full Story
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Virtual contact lenses for radar satellites

Virtual contact lenses for radar satellites Radar satellites supply the data used to map sea level and ocean currents. However, up until now the radar's 'eyes' have been blind where the oceans are covered by ice. Researchers have now developed a new analysis method to solve this problem. Full Story
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BESSY II sheds light on how the internal compass is constructed in magnetotactic bacteria

BESSY II sheds light on how the internal compass is constructed in magnetotactic bacteria Bacteria exist in many shapes and with very different talents. Magnetotactic bacteria can even sense the earth's magnetic field by making use of magnetic nanoparticles in their interior that act as an internal compass. Experts have now examined the magnetic compass of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense at BESSY II. Their results may be helpful in designing actuation devices for nanorobots and nanosensors for biomedical applications. Full Story
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BESSY II sheds light on how the internal compass is constructed in magnetotactic bacteria

BESSY II sheds light on how the internal compass is constructed in magnetotactic bacteria Bacteria exist in many shapes and with very different talents. Magnetotactic bacteria can even sense the earth's magnetic field by making use of magnetic nanoparticles in their interior that act as an internal compass. Experts have now examined the magnetic compass of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense at BESSY II. Their results may be helpful in designing actuation devices for nanorobots and nanosensors for biomedical applications. Full Story
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Timing is everything: Researchers describe genetic clockwork in germ cell development

Timing is everything: Researchers describe genetic clockwork in germ cell development The nematode C. elegans is truly an organizational talent: The tiny animals live for only two to three weeks, with sexual maturity lasting only four days. They still manage to generate over 300 offspring during this period. For this ambitious development program to function optimally, a large number of processes must be synchronized within their cells. Geneticists have deciphered a central signalling pathway that encodes and controls these processes. Full Story
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Timing is everything: Researchers describe genetic clockwork in germ cell development

Timing is everything: Researchers describe genetic clockwork in germ cell development The nematode C. elegans is truly an organizational talent: The tiny animals live for only two to three weeks, with sexual maturity lasting only four days. They still manage to generate over 300 offspring during this period. For this ambitious development program to function optimally, a large number of processes must be synchronized within their cells. Geneticists have deciphered a central signalling pathway that encodes and controls these processes. Full Story
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Dinosaurs ended — and originated — with a bang!

Dinosaurs ended -- and originated -- with a bang! It is commonly understood that the dinosaurs disappeared with a bang -- wiped out by a great meteorite impact on the Earth 66 million years ago. But their origins have been less understood. In a new study, scientists show that the key expansion of dinosaurs was also triggered by a crisis -- a mass extinction that happened 232 million years ago. Full Story
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Dinosaurs ended — and originated — with a bang!

Dinosaurs ended -- and originated -- with a bang! It is commonly understood that the dinosaurs disappeared with a bang -- wiped out by a great meteorite impact on the Earth 66 million years ago. But their origins have been less understood. In a new study, scientists show that the key expansion of dinosaurs was also triggered by a crisis -- a mass extinction that happened 232 million years ago. Full Story
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Cholesterol leash: Key tethering protein found to transport cellular cholesterol

Cholesterol leash: Key tethering protein found to transport cellular cholesterol Cholesterol is an essential component of living organisms, but the mechanisms that transport cholesterol inside the cell are poorly understood. Researchers have identified RELCH, a tethering protein that is essential for non-vesicular transport of cholesterol. The findings may lead to new discovery pathways for the treatment of cholesterol-related metabolic disorders. Full Story
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Cholesterol leash: Key tethering protein found to transport cellular cholesterol

Cholesterol leash: Key tethering protein found to transport cellular cholesterol Cholesterol is an essential component of living organisms, but the mechanisms that transport cholesterol inside the cell are poorly understood. Researchers have identified RELCH, a tethering protein that is essential for non-vesicular transport of cholesterol. The findings may lead to new discovery pathways for the treatment of cholesterol-related metabolic disorders. Full Story
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50x more stable adsorbent created

50x more stable adsorbent created A research team developed a technology to increase the stability of amine-containing adsorbents by fifty times, moving one step further toward commercializing stable adsorbents that last longer. Full Story
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50x more stable adsorbent created

50x more stable adsorbent created A research team developed a technology to increase the stability of amine-containing adsorbents by fifty times, moving one step further toward commercializing stable adsorbents that last longer. Full Story
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Formidable duo: Protective effect of CD9 and CD81 in COPD and accelerated aging

Formidable duo: Protective effect of CD9 and CD81 in COPD and accelerated aging Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a disease of accelerated lung aging, but the mechanism remains unclear. Researchers studied the aging-like phenotype and its underlying mechanisms in a COPD mouse model. Double deletion of tetraspanins CD9 and CD81 in epithelial cells downregulated expression of the protein SIRT. As SIRT1 is a key molecule that protects against various lifestyle-related diseases and aging, these tetraspanins may serve as novel therapeutic targets for COPD and aging. Full Story
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Education, not income, the best predictor of a long life

Education, not income, the best predictor of a long life Rising income and the subsequent improved standards of living have long been thought to be the most important factors contributing to a long and healthy life. However, new research has shown that instead, the level of education a person has is a much better predictor of life expectancy. Full Story
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Combination therapy doubles survival in metastatic lung cancer

Combination therapy doubles survival in metastatic lung cancer The immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab, combined with chemotherapy, doubles survival in patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSNSCLC) lacking genetic changes in the EGFR or ALK genes, when compared to chemotherapy alone, according to an international, Phase III clinical trial. Full Story
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Maternal metabolic factors and early-onset puberty

Maternal metabolic factors and early-onset puberty In a study of more than 15,000 girls and their mothers maternal overweight and hyperglycemia were linked to the earlier onset of puberty in girls 6 to 11 years old. Early puberty has been linked to multiple adverse health developments as girls grow up. Full Story
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Maternal metabolic factors and early-onset puberty

Maternal metabolic factors and early-onset puberty In a study of more than 15,000 girls and their mothers maternal overweight and hyperglycemia were linked to the earlier onset of puberty in girls 6 to 11 years old. Early puberty has been linked to multiple adverse health developments as girls grow up. Full Story
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